Newsletter 6 – 09/2020

Featured

Amazon Braket, Explore and experiment with quantum computing – Quantum computing is coming and Amazon releases it quantum computing service, now is just try yourself.

What every developer should know about database consistency – A simple and illustrated tutorial about database consistency, if you want to learn more abut databases and consistency models, you can start there.

How to use the Rust compiler as your integration testing framework – This post brings a nice point of view, with rust’s strong type system and some tricks you can avoid integration tests and let rust compiler is your integration framework, just write unit test and ship! This point of view can create a nice discussion, what’s your opinion?

Getting started with contributing to open source – A great post with nice tips to start contributing to open source project, if you want to get started it can help you a lot.

Categories for the Working C++ Programmer – A nice post explaining the basics of category theory to programmers. It has examples in c++ too, and for surer it’s worth reading it.

Things You Want to Do in Git and How to Do Them – It’s always good to review the basics, and make it fresh again in your head, this post can looks too basic, but it reviews simple concepts about git, about how to do a revert or a rebase correctly.

Peter’s Adventures in Ruby: Garbage Collection in Ruby – Nice post talking about how Ruby garbage collector and memory allocation works. Peter is writing a nice series about ruby internals too, check it out.

Misc

New Case Studies About Google’s Use of Go – A short and simple post by Rob Pike talking about Go use cases inside Google.

Rachel by the Bay · Tripping over the potholes in too many libraries – When should use a library and when should just code it? This is a interesting question, some people defend the idea that always install library and some people are more purist and defend the idea of always code simple logic. This is a short opinionated post, but bring’s the question to us.

Ractor – Ruby’s Actor-like concurrent abstraction – Ruby’s Ractor is close to be released (With Ruby 3 in December), and a nice preview (and tutorial) is given in this document.

Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates – I don’t have much to say about that news, it’s surprising!

When Should You NOT Use Rails? – When use x or y framework is a common discussion among teams and developers. This opinionated post brings a nice point of view about when you should or not use Rails framework.

How Sidekiq really works – Sidekiq is a popular library to do background processing in Ruby. Is very common to find an application using the traditional sidekiq + rails. This post explains in a easy way how it works under the hood. (I love posts explaining things under the hood).

Effective Debugging of Memory Leaks in Ruby – Sometimes find a memory leaks is not a rocket science, sometimes. This post is short and it tells you how to find memory leaks in ruby applications with simplicity.

Upgrading GitHub to Ruby 2.7 – Keep your applications up to date is important in every language, this post talks a little about how GitHub they did update their Ruby version.

Mocking Techniques for Go – Every time that I needed to made a mock in Go I had difficulties, this post is very clearly about how to do great mocks, with different techniques. Its a kind of post that I save to consult later.

Write your Own Virtual Machine – Tutorial to write your own virtual machine to run assembly language in only 250 lines of C code? That’s great and interesting!

Implementing traceroute in Gotraceroute is a very common tool when debuggind network things, this post explain how traceroute works under the hood and help you make your own implementation using Go.

5 Elixir Tips Learned in Code Review – Five simple tips to Elixir programming, this post is not a rocket science, but its useful.

Check my last posts:

  • Newsletter 7 – 10/2020
    A curated lists of the best things that I’ve read last month. Issue October 2020.
  • Clojure Journey VI – Data
    My sixth step on my journey through learn Clojure. In this step we talk about how Clojure handle basic data and its basic datatypes.

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